Nicolas Yuriar Mancillas

Nicolas Yuriar Mancillas (Domingo) (Clemente)

Born: Aug 1869 in San Ignacio, Sinaloa, Mexico.
Died: ?? Unknown

World War 1 draft card for Nicolas Yuriar that says he was working for the Southern Pacific Railroad, in Maricopa, Arizona, in Sept 1918, and says he had no physical impairments.  Lists his birthday as Sept 10, 1898, and his mother as Feliciano Mancillas in Culiacan, Sinaloa, Mex.

 

Then I found a few border crossing documents for several years, one in 1920, 1924, and finally in 1944.  He’s listed as being about 5’3 ½” tall, with black hair and dark eyes.

 

In 1920, his border crossing paper says he was planning to come here for about 2 months for work. He was a mechanic, headed for Tuscon, AZ.  It says he had previously been to the US from Sept 1918 – Feb 1919. Those dates line up with the WW1 draft card, dated Sept 1918. He had $44 in his pocket, and no friends or relatives to join with.  Virginia Soto came with him in 1920, with here papers saying she was coming to visit.   She’s listed as 22 years old, 5’ 2”, dark hair, dark eyes, dark complexion.  It looks like it says she has a mole on her left lip, but the writing is hard to decipher.  It does say that this is her first time in America though.

 

His July 1924 border crossing paper mentions that he was now missing the nail from his right middle finger.  His occupation is now a Chauffer, and he’s going to meet up with his friend Juan Ruiz.  He was looking to remain here permanently, and hoping to find work.  Virigina did not accompany him.  She came across in 1925 to visit him, and again in 1926.  Both times, she is accompanied by her daughter, Maria Altagracia Rosario Yuriar.  The 1926 document gives Nicolas’s address as 9?6 E. 12th Street, Los Angeles, California.

 

They are listed on the 1930 Census as living in Los Angeles, and now Nicolas works for a restaurant.

 

At some point, Nicholas must have gone back to Mexico for whatever reason, because he is crossing the border back into the USA in 1944, on Dec 7.  It’s hard to read because the scan of the card is so bad, but it looks like he was coming to stay with a Brother-in-Law.  I haven’t found any record of Virigina’s whereabouts at this time, but given that they were not in the 1940 census, it’s possible the family went back to Mexico? I’m not sure.

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